Happy New Year 2009


Auld Lang Syne

 Words Adapted from a Traditional Song (1788)

by Robert Burns (1759-96) et al

FIRST VERSE:

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,

And never brought to mind?

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,

And auld lang syne?

CHORUS:

For auld lang syne, my dear,

For auld lang syne,

We’ll tak a cup of kindness yet,

For auld lang syne!

SECOND VERSE:

And surely ye’ll be your pint stowp!

And surely I’ll be mine!

And we’ll tak a cup o’kindness yet,

For auld lang syne.

(REPEAT CHORUS)

Popular New Year’s Eve tune "Auld Lang Syne" has its roots in Scotland in the 18th century.
Actually, it’s not any of these. On New Year’s Eve, the most common song for most English-speaking people to sing is "Auld Lang Syne." Isn’t it funny how it’s possible to sing and hear a song so many times and have no idea what it means? And wouldn’t it be funny if it meant "Big Pink Elephants"?

A good sub-question is, what language is it?

It turns out that "Auld Lang Syne" is an extremely old Scottish song that was first written down in the 1700s. Robert Burns is the person whose transcription got the most attention, so the song is associated with him.

According to this page, a good translation of the words "auld lang syne" is "times gone by." So (incorporating a couple of other translations) when we sing this song, we are saying, "We’ll drink a cup of kindness yet for time gone by."

­

此条目发表在我的收藏分类目录。将固定链接加入收藏夹。

发表评论

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com 徽标

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  更改 )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  更改 )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  更改 )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  更改 )

Connecting to %s